H.R. 1 (2021) Policy Breakdown

Virginia Court Blocks Plan to Accept Ballots Without Postmarks After Election Day

Court Enjoins State Election Board from Accepting Absentee Ballots Without Postmarks After Election Day

(RICHMOND, VA.) – October 28, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF), on behalf of Thomas Reed, a local electoral board member, praised a court injunction granted today to prevent the Virginia State Board of Elections from accepting absentee ballots received up to three days after Election Day without legible postmarks (Reed v. Virginia Dept. of Elections).

Mr. Reed had a straightforward request: follow the law,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “The judge enjoined the Virginia State Board of Elections from issuing instructions to count late ballots without postmarks.”

The ruling was given from the bench around 3pm Eastern time Wednesday. More documents about the ruling will be provided here as they are available.

Existing Virginia statute (24.2-709) is clear: “any absentee ballot returned to the general registrar after the closing of the polls on election day but before noon on the third day after the election and postmarked on or before the date of the election shall be counted…” (emphasis added).

The defendants’ guidance to local election boards on August 4, 2020, stood contrary to Virginia law, particularly allowing ballots received within the Election Day plus-3 window even if they do not “have a postmark, or the postmark is missing or illegible.”

The plaintiff sought declaratory and injunctive relief from the Circuit Court of the County of Frederick that:

  1. Instructions issued by the defendants conflict with specific Virginia statute;
  2. A postmark dated on or before Election Day be required for acceptance;
  3. The Intelligent Mail Barcode system by the USPS be used to verify date of mailing in the cases of missing or illegible postmarks; and,
  4. Enjoin the defendants from issuing any further instructions that conflict with existing Virginia statutes.

The plaintiff for this action is Thomas P. Reed, a Frederick County Board of Elections Member.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

The case was filed in the Circuit Court of the County of Frederick, Virginia. The case number is 20-622. Counsel for the Public Interest Legal Foundation is J. Christian Adams. Winchester-based Phillip S. Griffin II serves as co-counsel.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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Video: Visiting Pittsburgh Voters Registered at Commercial Addresses

You Can’t Claim a Non-Residential Address Unless You Actually Live There

(PITTSBURGH, PA.) – October 28, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) produced and released a video documenting visits to non-residential addresses claimed by registered voters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Pennsylvania’s voter registration law requires prospective registrants to list addresses of actual residence. The Foundation visited commercial addresses around the Pittsburgh metro which are listed on local voter rolls.

All locations were listed on local voter rolls with voting credits issued as recently as the 2018 General midterm elections.

Pennsylvanians Register to Vote at Non-Residential Addresses from Public Interest Legal on Vimeo.

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“Pennsylvania has vacant lots and businesses listed as residences for voting. Were mail ballots sent to these locations?PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said.

Prior to the visits, the Foundation inspected similar matters in the Las Vegas, Nevada, region and previously published a national report featuring tallies of non-residential address used for voting purposes. 

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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PILF National Billboard Campaign: Avoid Mail Voting

Billboards Appearing in Contested States

(INDIANAPOLIS, IN.) – October 15, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) formally announced its national billboard campaign to encourage the American electorate to cast ballots in person.  

“Voting in person is the gold standard to having your vote count,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “Mail ballots disenfranchise voters because ballots are lost, completed with mistakes, and sometimes even stolen or thrown away. We hope these billboards serve as a reminder of their in-person options that are proven to ensure votes are properly received and counted.”

The initial messaging comes in two forms: “Vote in Person: It’s Better than the Mail,” and “Vote in Person: Protect Your Vote.” A cartoonish image of a mail ballot addressed to “Your Neighbor” is situated with the messages.

Billboards (digital and traditional) are going up in major cities and near busy freeways in states like Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, and others.

Pittsburgh, PA

Detroit, MI

During the 2020 Election cycle, the Foundation demonstrated in courts and the public conversation that the United States is not ready for an emergency transition to all-mail voting. Briefs were filed in 11 federal lawsuits demonstrating the numbers of apparently deceased and duplicated registrations still on the rolls in those states. PILF lawsuits against Detroit and Allegheny County, Pennsylvania triggered voter roll maintenance efforts.

PILF also outlined how more than 28 million mail ballots since 2012 went untracked and unreturned to election offices. Millions more were rejected or sent to outdated or otherwise wrong addresses.

The Foundation released a national report detailing the hundreds of thousands of deceased and duplicated registrants across the nation’s voter rolls, which are now the basis for tens of millions of mail ballots being put in the postal system.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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PILF Client Demands Court Action Against Virginia Plan to Accept Ballots Without Postmarks

Seeks Injunction to Enforce Specific Virginia Law Requiring Postmark

(ALEXANDRIA, VA.) – October 13, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) filed, on behalf of Thomas Reed, a local electoral board member, a lawsuit against the Virginia Department of Elections and the State Board seeking an injunction against new administrative guidance that would accept absentee ballots received within three days after Election Day despite missing or illegible postmarks. Such guidance stands in stark violation of a Virginia statute signed into law on March 11, 2020 (Reed v. Virginia Dept. of Elections).

Existing Virginia statute (24.2-709) is clear: “any absentee ballot returned to the general registrar after the closing of the polls on election day but before noon on the third day after the election and postmarked on or before the date of the election shall be counted…” (emphasis added).

The defendants’ guidance to local election boards on August 4, 2020, stands contrary to Virginia law, particularly allowing ballots received within the Election Day plus-3 window even if they do not “have a postmark, or the postmark is missing or illegible.”

Mr. Reed has a straightforward request. Follow the law,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said.

The plaintiff seeks declaratory and injunctive relief from the Circuit Court of the County of Frederick that:

  1. Instructions issued by the defendants conflict with specific Virginia statute;
  2. A postmark dated on or before Election Day be required for acceptance;
  3. The Intelligent Mail Barcode system by the USPS be used to verify date of mailing in the cases of missing or illegible postmarks; and,
  4. Enjoin the defendants from issuing any further instructions that conflict with existing Virginia statutes.

The plaintiff for this action is Thomas P. Reed, a Frederick County Board of Elections Member.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

The case was filed in the Circuit Court of the County of Frederick, Virginia. The case number is 20-622. Counsel for the Public Interest Legal Foundation is J. Christian Adams. Winchester-based Phillip S. Griffin II serves as co-counsel.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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Video: Visiting Nevada Voters Registered at Commercial Addresses

You Can’t Claim a Non-Residential Address Unless You Actually Live There

(LAS VEGAS, NV.) – October 5, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) produced and released a video documenting visits to non-residential addresses claimed by registered voters in southern Nevada.

Nevada’s voter registration form requires prospective registrants to list addresses of actual residence. The Foundation performed site visits at various visits around the Las Vegas metro and Pahrump to investigate questionable addresses on local voter rolls.

Voting from Nevada Businesses from Public Interest Legal on Vimeo.

All locations were listed on local voter rolls with voting credits issued as recently as the 2018 General midterm elections.

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“There are a lot of people registered to vote at commercial addresses—meaning businesses, mining facilities, liquor stores—and that messes up the voter rolls. These people, under Nevada law, should be registered [to vote] where they live and not at a business,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said in the video. “Election officials are going to be mailing ballots to every registered voter—whether or not they ask for it—so the integrity of the address is so important in that situation.”

Prior to the visits, the Foundation published a national report featuring tallies of non-residential address used for voting purposes. In a separate study, Clark County disclosed to the Foundation that more than 223,000 mail ballots from the June primaries were returned undeliverable. 

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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Harris County, TX Sued to Prevent Noncitizen Voter Registration

Records Apparently Show Admitted Foreign Nationals Successfully Registering

(HOUSTON, TX.) – September 28, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) filed a petition for writ of mandamus against the Harris County Voter Registrar, seeking to prevent future occurrences of apparently self-identified foreign nationals being accepted into the local voter roll (In re Public Interest Legal Foundation).

Voter registration applications printed by both the U.S. Government and Texas pose a direct question: “Are you a citizen of the United States?” PILF research into Harris County records revealed a repeating problem of individuals answering “NO,” yet were registered anyway.

The Foundation present detailed examples of similar files and seeks a court order that Harris County uniformly challenge or reject all future voter registration applications that do not contain the answer “YES” to the citizenship eligibility question.

“The Foundation made a federal case to access to these records—now we see what the fight was all for,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “Individuals claiming to be foreign nationals should not be registered in Harris County. These failures harm citizens, but they also put those immigrants into serious jeopardy with federal officials. We hope to see swift action prior to the voting this fall.

Read the court filing and exhibits here.

The Foundation previously settled a federal lawsuit to review noncitizen voter registration cancellation records held in Harris County after it defeated a motion to dismiss the case in March 2019.

The Foundation originally selected Harris County for study after local officials described the underlying problems spanning nearly two decades—most often in the context of lobbying for or against election reform bills in Austin or Washington.

The case was filed in the in the Court of Appeals for the Fourteenth District of Texas in Houston, number 14-20-00665-cv.

Attorneys for the Public Interest Legal Foundation are J. Christian Adams and Noel H. Johnson. Brenham-based Andy Taylor of Andy Taylor & Associates, P.C. serves as local counsel.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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Groundbreaking National Voter Roll Study Reveals Alarming Trends as States Prepare to Vote by Mail

‘SAVE Database’ Uncovers Widespread Problems on Unprecedented Scale

(INDIANAPOLIS, IN.)September 16, 2020: An independent, nationwide analysis of voter rolls in 42 states has identified thousands of probable deceased and duplicate registrants, as well as cases of individuals credited for voting more than once. The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) has launched the Safeguarding America’s Votes and Elections (SAVE) Database as an analysis tool to track voter roll deficiencies and potential problem areas across America. Announced today, the groundbreaking findings in their national report indicates that the SAVE Database raises serious concerns over the integrity of states’ voter files as election officials anticipate a surge in mail-in voting this fall.

“The detailed information and analysis presented in this report makes it abundantly clear that states across America, including many that will determine control of the White House and Congress, are unprepared to accommodate a surge in mail-in voting this fall,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “After standardizing registration lists in 42 states, Public Interest Legal Foundation’s SAVE Database uncovered voter rolls saturated with alarming errors. Prior to publishing this report, PILF shared some findings with state election officials in hopes they would validate and act on helpful information. With only weeks to go before the start of early voting, we’re hopeful this report will help spur broader public understanding about apparent problems which call into question the integrity of our election process.”

SAVE revealed 349,773 apparently deceased registrants across 41 states’ voter rolls, with New York, Texas, Michigan, Florida and California alone accounting for 51 percent of the total.

During the 2018 General Election, 37,889 likely duplicate registrants are apparently credited for casting two votes from the same address, and 34,000 registrants appear to have voted from non-residential addresses. Additionally, 6,718 registrants were apparently credited for voting after death. During the 2016 General Election, SAVE revealed that number was higher, with a total of 7,890 registrants apparently being credited for voting after death.

After PILF collected data from 42 states and put it into a format where it could be studied, it was rigorously compared to commercial and government databases to increase confidence in the conclusions with particular emphasis on validating identities matched across state lines. Also included with the data were voter history fields, namely, data about when each registrant voted. The combination of state election data, commercial data, and federal sources such as the Social Security Death Index, provides researchers with perhaps the best platform ever constructed to analyze the health of the voter rolls and catalogue potential vulnerabilities.

The findings are a helpful starting point for state election officials to review the findings and make final determinations and take appropriate actions.

Notable Findings:

  • 349,773: total number of potentially deceased registrants across 41 states.
    • Michigan, Florida, New York, Texas and California account for roughly 51% of national dead registrants.
  • In 2016, 7,890 registrants were apparently credited for voting after death.
  • In 2018, 6,718 registrants were credited for voting after death.
    • North Carolina leads the U.S. in dead registrants credited for voting after death.
  • 43,760 likely duplicate registrants appear to have cast second votes in 2016 from the same address.
  • 37,889 likely duplicate registrants appear to have cast second votes in 2018 from the same address.
    • Thousands of these apparent double votes were exclusively mail ballots
  • 8,360 – Number of registrants apparently registered in 2 states and credited for voting in both states in 2018.
  • 5,500 – Number of apparently duplicate registrants credited for voting twice in the same state from 2 different addresses in 2018.
  • 34,000 – Number of registrants credited for voting from apparently non-residential addresses in 2018.

Download the full report here. If you are a member of the press and would like to interview or speak with J. Christian Adams and Logan Churchwell, please contact media@publicinterestlegal.org.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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PILF Brief: Maricopa County Must Stop Allowing Ballot Spoilage

County Rule Ensures an Influx of Overvotes in 2020 Election

(PHOENIX, AZ.) – September 4, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) filed an amicus brief in a lawsuit seeking to prevent County Recorder Adrian Fontes from instructing early voters to correct mistakes on their ballot by simply crossing out their first choice, rather than obtain a replacement. This spoils the ballot under state law. The new cross-out instruction was given in the August primary, despite a specific state procedure barring the practice (AZ Public Integrity Alliance v. Fontes).  

The Arizona State Elections Procedure Manual warns that “no votes will be counted for a particular office if they overvote.” If a voter makes a mistake on a ballot, they are required to “request a new ballot” to correct the mistake. Ahead of the 2020 Elections, Maricopa County is unilaterally instructing local voters to cross-out mistakes and re-select their preference on the same ballot—thereby creating overvotes.

Courtesy Maricopa County

The Foundation’s brief outlines how Maricopa County’s actions run directly in opposition to established Arizona law and, if left unchecked, “would infuse chaos into the election and potentially disenfranchise voters.”

“Maricopa County officials are effectively instructing voters to spoil ballots after making a marking mistake. Remember the inspectors with magnifying glasses 20 years ago in Florida? Maricopa County is inviting that experience again in the middle of a pandemic,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “Maricopa County should not be allowed to make its own election rules and procedures—especially when they are contrary to Arizona law.”

The Foundation’s brief focuses on two primary arguments.

Maricopa’s cross-out instruction is out of line with the Arizona Election Procedures Manual and runs contrary to state law. The manual is clear: “inform voters that no votes will be counted for a particular office if they overvote (vote for more than candidates than permitted) and therefore the voter should contact the County Recorder to request a new ballot in the event of an overvote.

Defendants arguments to justify the unilateral change lack merit. Having different sets of instructions across counties and even periods of voting creates confusion and can lead to disenfranchisement.

Read the full brief here.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

The litigation continues in the Superior Court of Arizona – Maricopa County. The case number is LC2020-000252. Counsel for the Public Interest Legal Foundation is Sue Becker.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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Maryland Election Board Shares Voter Roll Data to Settle PILF Lawsuit

(BALTIMORE, MD.) – September 2, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) lawsuit against the Maryland State Board of Elections (MSBOE) to gain access to the state’s voter registration roll formally ended in a settlement today (Public Interest Legal Foundation v. Linda Lamone).

“Voter registration data is subject to public inspection, no matter where you live,PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “We are pleased to receive detailed registrant information due to us under the Motor Voter law. We look forward to sharing future audit findings with proper authorities.

The settlement agreement outlines, in part (emphasis added):

“Defendants shall process the Application and provide the Voter Lists requested on the Application to Plaintiff in exchange for the reasonable fee of $125 required of all applicants who seek similar data from the State of Maryland, except that the data provided to Plaintiff shall include the voters’ dates of birth and voting history for the 2018 Gubernatorial General Election, 2018 Gubernatorial Primary Election, 2016 Presidential General Election, and 2016 Presidential Primary Election.”

The initial complaint filed on December 16, 2019, explained the Foundation requested copies of Maryland’s statewide voter file and select voting histories on November 13, pursuant to the application procedure set forth by the MSBOE. The State notified PILF two days later that its application was denied because neither the organization nor its employees were Maryland registered voters.

The Foundation sought relief under Section 8 of the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which requires officials to make voter list maintenance documents like the voter roll itself available for inspection to the general public. The law also offers a private right to file a lawsuit if denied.

The Foundation recently sued the Michigan Secretary of State for failing to disclose voting records related to the 2018 General Election from the City of Southfield. The Foundation seeks records involving the 193 allegedly altered voter history files from November 2018 that led to six felony charges against Southfield City Clerk Sherikia Hawkins.

The case was filed in the United States District Court for the District of Maryland. The case number was 1:19-cv-03564. The attorney for the Public Interest Legal Foundation is Noel H. Johnson. Baltimore-based Glenn E. Bushel and Richard L. Costella of Tydings & Rosenberg LLP served as local counsel.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the country.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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PILF Sues Michigan SOS for Southfield Clerk Voting Data

Records Should Reveal Which Voters Sherikia Hawkins Allegedly Attempted to Disenfranchise

(LANSING, MI.) – August 26, 2020: The Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) filed a lawsuit today against Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson for failing to disclose voting records related to the 2018 General Election from the City of Southfield (Public Interest Legal Foundation v. Benson).

The Foundation seeks records involving the 193 allegedly altered voter history files from November 2018 that led to six felony charges against Southfield City Clerk Sherikia Hawkins.

193 Southfield voters trusted their absentee ballots would be counted in November 2018 without issue,” PILF President and General Counsel J. Christian Adams said. “The criminal allegations surround this case are alarming and must be fully studied to ensure that history doesn’t repeat. The public has a right to know about the voters who had their votes cancelled.

The complaint, filed August 26, explains in part (emphasis added):

“The records requested are voter history records for a small subset of registrants in Southfield, Michigan. Southfield City Clerk Sherikia Hawkins allegedly created one voter history record for a subset of Southfield voters indicating that they did not vote in the 2018 election in order to nullify the effect of those registrants casting an absentee ballot. In creating a voter history record indicating that the registrant did not vote, it allowed Hawkins to (allegedly and falsely) disregard and not count the absentee ballots of those voters. When the actions of Hawkins were discovered, yet another voter history record was allegedly created, a truthful one indicating that the voters indeed did cast an absentee ballot. The Foundation merely requests these voter history records as they will indicate the registrants who sent voted absentee ballots to Hawkins and for whom Hawkins has been charged with cancelling their vote … Secretary Benson is denying the Foundation access to the requested records.”

The Foundation seeks relief under Section 8 of the National Voter Registration Act of 1993, which requires officials to make voter list maintenance documents like, in this case, voting history documents due to their integral part in triggering systematic voter list functions related to potential inactivity. The law also offers a private right to file a lawsuit if denied.

The Public Interest Legal Foundation is leading the nation in enforcing election integrity laws and the National Voter Registration Act, having brought cases in North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Maryland, Florida, Mississippi, Texas, and Maine and filed amicus briefs in litigation across the nation.

The new case was filed in the United States District Court for the Western District of Michigan. The case number is 1:20-cv-00818. Counsel for the Public Interest Legal Foundation is Kaylan L. Phillips.

Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF) is a 501(c)(3) public interest law firm dedicated to election integrity. The Foundation exists to assist states and others to aid the cause of election integrity and fight against lawlessness in American elections. Drawing on numerous experts in the field, PILF seeks to protect the right to vote and preserve the Constitutional framework of American elections.

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