By: Quin Hillyer

September 30, 2022

It’s bad enough that just six counties in Minnesota feature voting lists with 515 duplicate registrations. It’s worse when a growing number (total still to be determined) actually show votes cast under both registrations. It’s stunning when one of those apparent double voters (or people fraudulently voting twice under the same man’s name) is a convicted criminal who has been committed for mental illness.

That’s right: In Nicollet County, two votes were cast in the name of Damien Kingbird, who, according to records, has been found guilty of numerous crimes, just a partial list of which includes “making terrorist threats, sexual assault, and even sexually abusing a 13-year-old girl.”

The quote, with accompanying court documents, comes from the Public Interest Legal Foundation, which filed suit against all six counties this week for failing to clean up their voter rolls, thus providing golden opportunities for vote fraud. PILF sampled just six of Minnesota’s 87 counties but said it has indications other counties also have faulty lists.

Even a few hundred illegal votes can make a big difference. Remember that Minnesota is where liberal Democrat Al Franken was declared the victor of a Senate race by just 312 seats, only after “lost” ballots were suddenly discovered in his favor while hundreds of votes apparently cast for his opponent were discounted for various reasons. Even then, it later turned out that apparently, more than 1,000 votes were cast by or in the name of felons ineligible to vote.

The quote, with accompanying court documents, comes from the Public Interest Legal Foundation, which filed suit against all six counties this week for failing to clean up their voter rolls, thus providing golden opportunities for vote fraud. PILF sampled just six of Minnesota’s 87 counties but said it has indications other counties also have faulty lists.

Even a few hundred illegal votes can make a big difference. Remember that Minnesota is where liberal Democrat Al Franken was declared the victor of a Senate race by just 312 seats, only after “lost” ballots were suddenly discovered in his favor while hundreds of votes apparently cast for his opponent were discounted for various reasons. Even then, it later turned out that apparently, more than 1,000 votes were cast by or in the name of felons ineligible to vote.

It is perfectly reasonable to accept the reality that there were nowhere near enough voting errors and fraud to overturn President Joe Biden’s victory in 2020 and still to insist, with 100% truth on one’s side, that voting fraud and error are significant problems in certain jurisdictions across the nation. And also to insist that administrative sloppiness or dereliction, such as the double-registrations in Minnesota, create opportunities for mistakes and mischief that may never be caught.

When not one but two votes are cast in the same election in the name of a convicted and mental-illness-committed person, without being discovered until two years later, something is drastically wrong either with the system or with the officials running it. Voting already is remarkably easy. More needs to be done not to make it even easier but instead to make sure the integrity of each vote is guaranteed.

Public Interest Legal Foundation